Violent Video Games Increase Aggression in Kids

Product by:
Chic Mom

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On October 7, 2012
Last modified:May 28, 2013

Summary:

 

Craig Anderson, who has spent his life studying the affects of violent video game play on youth behavior is confident through his study published in Psychological Bulletin, an American Psychological Association journal that kids who are exposed to violent video games reveal increased aggressive thoughts and behavior resulting in antisocial traits.

A study led by Craig Anderson, Professor of Psychology at Iowa State University establishes: “analyzing 130 research reports on more than 130,000 subjects worldwide, proves conclusively that exposure to violent video games makes more aggressive, less caring kids — regardless of their age, sex or culture.

The research used meta-analytical procedure which combines related literature and previous studies to judge the effect of violent video games on children irrespective of ethnicity, gender, or age.

The kids are not at a huge risk such as joining a gang or not but leads to aggressive behavior in general.  It is suggested that Public Policy should intervene to reduce such risks.  But in the mean time it is the responsibility of parents just as they establish other ‘do’ and ‘do not’ rules to decide which games are healthy for their child.

It is a known fact that kids learn better when they are actively involved.  Video game play is active involvement in the act that leads to unforeseen result.  An example would be suppose you wanted to learn how to fly an airplane.  The best method for learning this would be to use a video game flight simulator. Similarly, children who play violent video games are more likely to respond with aggression and expect other to behave aggressively too.

President Barack Obama has called for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to renew scientific research into the relationship between video games, media images and violence. He has also asked Congress to support a bill that would grant the CDC $10 million to conduct this new research.

[image source: http://springghs2012ac3.wikispaces.com/GHS-WacksmanZ ]